Monaco Grand Prix: Pre Race Thoughts

Monaco Grand Prix: Pre Race Thoughts

Bonjour mes amis! Et bienvenue à Monaco. The traveling circus has once again returned to the Principality for the crown jewel in the Formula 1 Calendar. The 3.340km circuit is narrow to say the least, translating to a slight advantage for a setup with shorter gear ratios. It’s a tight squeeze to the first corner, St Devote, where many a first lap incident has occurred. Turns 4 and 5 are bumpier on the street circuit, causing drivers to change their lines to avoid bottoming out down to Maribeau. Drivers must be careful not to lose the rear through Portier to be able to get the best line to go flat out through the tunnel. The chicane at the exit of the tunnel has been the scene of many an out-braking manoeuvre over the years, on occasion catching the car in front up the rear… Through to the final sector and La Rascasse. Marking the second slowest point on the track, braking and racing line are vital to run an inch away from the inside wall  Overtaking is “easiest” at the Nouvelle Chicane, and the start-finish straight where drivers can get a little extra from DRS. The unforgiving nature of Monaco translates into an all important qualifying. Focus on front wing aerodynamic grip and downforce through the corners will be vital over the weekend, giving the Renault powered teams a fighting chance. Concerns of  fuel saving and energy recovery take a backseat for this race. Some drivers will try and aim for a little bit of oversteer in the corners to make the most of being able to accelerate out from the corner sooner.

Under the threat of rain, qualifying got underway largely without incident. Track temperature was a balmy 29 C, falling to 27 C as the afternoon wore on. Mercedes’ Lewis Hamilton denied Nico Rosberg a hatrick of pole positions in Monte Carlo. Hamilton took the top spot with a blistering 1:15.098, relinquishing Rosberg to start from P2 on the grid. Ferrari’s Sebastian Vettel was best of the rest, dipping into the 1:15s to secure P3 on the grid.

Mercedes were unsurprisingly strong in qualifying, though didn’t run away with the session. Hamilton’s session was slow starting, being caught in traffic from the two Lotus’, before losing aero grip through turn 11. After a front wing adjustment, the Briton was back on track, playing cat and mouse for the fastest lap. Lewis Hamilton had the advantage of choice in going out first in the final session, and remained unchallenged for the pole lap. It was a 1:15.098 on his final run on the super soft compound that did it, though the threat from Rosberg never came. Rosberg struggled to keep his F1 W06 from locking up at St Devote. A near repeat of last year spoiled Jenson Button’s lap at the end of Q2. Though thankfully this year there was no debate that the front right lock up was an accident. Unfortunately for Rosberg, his final in Q3 lap was a scrappy one. Diving into the pits, Rosberg’s penultimate lap of 1:15.440 on the super softs will slot him in to P2.

Sebastian Vettel had looked promising in the Ferrari to challenge for dark horse pole position. Despite an aggressive qualifying, the top spot remained just out of reach. Missing the apex in turn 11 spoiled the SF15-T’s final lap, making a 1:15.849 in the super soft tyres a time for P3. Sebastian however did remain 0.8s clear of team mate Kimi Raikkonen overall. Suffering from a little too much oversteer in the earlier sessions, Raikkonen lost the rear again as the chequered flag fell, relinquishing the Finn to P6 with 1:16.041 on the super softs.

Red Bull Racing are traditionally strong on the streets of Monaco, and today was no different. The high downforce, low engine wear nature of the Monaco Street Circuit Daniel Ricciardo was an easy P4, though the Australian felt he could have easily pushed for P3. After being caught in traffic and not getting the perfect run, Ricciardo’s best time on the super softs of 1:16.041 slots the RB11 into P4. Separated by a mere 0.141s, Daniil Kvyat lines up P5 just behind his team mate with a time of 1:16.182.

It was a bittersweet session for Force India, with Sergio Perez qualifying in a solid P7. Heading out early in Q2, Perez worked to get his confidence up through the narrow circuit. Paying off in the final session, Perez pulled out a 1:16.999 on the super softs. Nico Hulkenberg however was an early victim to the barriers. In the final minutes of Q1, Hulkenberg in the VJM08 lost the rear into Portier, sending the left rear into the barrier. Hulkenberg was however able to make it through to the second session, though a mistake into the final corner cost him passage into Q3. Qualifying in P13* with 1:17.193, Hulkenberg will also start on the super softs.

Toro Rosso were another team to gain advantage from the high downforce track, with both Sainz and Verstappen having strong opening sessions. Unfortunately for the Scuderia, the results on track didn’t translate in the final grid line up. Carlos Sainz challenged Perez for P7, finishing just a tenth of a second slower than the Force India in P8 with 1:16.931. The rookie has however been handed a penalty for missing the compulsory weigh bridge. So, all the hard for Sainz is undone as the STR10 will start from the pit lane. After a stormer of practice sessions, Max Verstappen’s STR10 lost steam in the final session, failing to improve from his Q2 time of 1:16.546, Verstappen will start P10 with 1:16.957 on the super softs.

Almost happy days for Lotus, with both E23s running strong. While some may have watched in bated breath as Pastor lapped blisteringly fast and close to the barriers**, the Lotus driver managed to pull ahead of his team mate early on in the session. After being caught in traffic in the final session, Maldonado was unable to keep temperatures up in the E23, and was unable to improve on his final lap, making for a qualifying position of P9 with 1:16.946. Grosjean had less luck during qualifying, locking a wheel into turn 15 on his flying lap. The small error cost Romain a slot in Q3, settling the Lotus of P11 with 1:17.007. However, due to an early gear box change, Grosjean carriers a 5-place grid penalty to tomorrow’s race.

McLarens’ MP4-30 appears to be better suited to the Monaco streets, largely due to the low engine wear. Jenson Button would have made it through to the final session had it not been for waved yellow flags in the first sector, spoiling his final flying lap. Button had a strong handle on the set up and was able to push the McLaren for pace and grip. Unable to catch a break however, his fastest Q2 time put him P12 with 1:17.093. Alonso didn’t carry any luck through to qualifying either, despite a strong start. The Spaniard, going strong was threatening to make it through to Q3. This turned out to be empty threats however as Alonso’s Honda chose to pack up in Q2, relegating him to P15 and a 1:26.632.

Williams  were surprisingly less competitive in qualifying. There wasn’t a specific issue hindering the FW37’s performance, it appeared that Monaco just didn’t suit the Williams set up. Massa couldn’t get the pace he needed out of the car to make it to the top ten shoot out, only managing a 1:17.278 for P14.Throughout the session, Bottas was unable to keep the temperatures in the tyres, and lost time due to the subsequent lack of grip. In a galant act of mate-ship, Bottas backed off his final flying lap after making a mistake on his own. By backing off, Bottas allowed his team mate through into clear track ahead to have a run a his lap. Calling it a day, the Finn dove into the pits, settling himself for P17.

Sauber opted for a different strategy in qualifying, venturing out first on the super softs while the rest of the grid (with the exception of the Manors) started on the soft compound tyres. Unfortunately for Sauber, the strategy didn’t exactly pay off, as neither Nasr nor Ericsson made it out of the initial drop zone. Felipe Nasr did manage to out-qualify his team mate in P16 with 1:18.101 on 4-lap old super softs. Ericsson will start P18, after a lap 4-tenths slower with 1:18.513.

Rounding off the back of the grid is the Manor F1 Team. Both the Manor’s made it through the circuit with enough grip and speed to qualify inside the 107% rule (1:21.884), with Stevens again out qualifying Merhi for P19 and P20 with 1:20.655 and 1:20.994 respectively.

The atmosphere of the Monaco Grand Prix is rather extravagant. The Monte Carlo streets are phenonemal. Lined with yachts and champagne off track, the streets are so narrow that it’s hard to believe a race can physically be held here. Needless to say, there is very little margin for error. To top things off, an 80% chance of the safety car keeps things interesting (like we would be bored here?). Starting from pole, it’s Hamilton’s race to lose tomorrow. Now we wait to see who can catch him.

– Alex

* Expected to start P11 due to penalties on the grid

** I may or may not have been one of them.

 

Spanish Grand Prix: Pre Race Thoughts

Spanish Grand Prix: Pre Race Thoughts

Hola! Buenos dias amigos, bienvenidos a España. The first stop of the European leg of the championship kicks off at the Circuit de Barcelona-Catalunya. The 4.655km, high downforce circuit, is made up of a high speed first and second sector, before the tight and twisty third sector. The tyre allocation for the weekend is the medium and hard compound tyre, with teams aiming for a two-stopper. Turn 1 allows for overtaking under braking before flicking the car into turns 2 and 3. The high speed turn 3 puts a lot of stress under the front left tyres, but, does allow for overtaking (if you dare). Turn 5 has caught a few out over the weekend with front lock ups as the track falls away. Traction is all important here as drivers snake their way through turns 7, 8, and 9. Opening out onto the back straight its full throttle, utilising DRS into another overtaking attempt at turn 10. Best to avoid the kerbs in the final sector to keep traction, and allow for some late braking through the chicane at turns 14 and 15. Through to the final corner, a good racing line through turn 16 can give you the edge down the long pit straight and another DRS zone.

Traditionally a hot and dry weekend, qualifying got underway in ideal conditions with Nico Rosberg managing to steal pole position for the first time this season. Hamilton was left to challenge his team mate, though will settle to start P2. Ferrari’s Sebastian Vettel was the best of the rest, after qualifying just behind the Mercedes in P3 with 1:25.458.

It was a solid effort by Lotus this afternoon, though for the first time this season the E23s didn’t make an appearance in Q3. The team worked from the morning to find a better balance in the car and ran a different strategy in qualifying, meaning the Maldonado and Grosjean have an extra set of fresh tyres for the race. Good one. Starting on the hard compound, Grosjean and Maldonado ran for four laps before swapping to the softer medium tyre. In Q1, Maldonado shot himself up and out of the drop zone seeing him move through to the second session, followed shortly by Grosjean. Split by a tenth of a second, Grosjean’s best effort was 1:27.375 for P11, ahead of Maldonado’s 1:27.450 in P12.

McLaren have brought a number of upgrades to Spain, with the results of their efforts paying off in practice and in qualifying. Alonso on his first run in Q1 on the medium tyres set a time good enough for P5, ahead of Button in P6, seeing both the MP4-30s through to Q2. With a few minor tweaks to the front wing, Alonso and Button ventured out into Q2 for the first time this season. Button found his car pulling left under braking, costing the Briton lap time. Unable to carry the momentum through to Q3, the two McLaren’s will start P13 and P14 with Alonso in front by a tenth of a second.

Manor F1 Team line up the back of the grid with Stevens setting 1:31.200 after three laps on the medium compound to start P19. In front of his home crowd, Merhi set 1:32.038 after four laps on the medium compound for P20.

Bahrain Grand Prix: Pre Race Thoughts

Bahrain Grand Prix: Pre Race Thoughts

Ahlan wa sahlan! Welcome to Bahrain, and the first night race of the season at the 5.412km Sakhir Circuit. The flowing nature of the circuit has a rather rhythmic nature through sector two. Straight line speed is an advantage, though for the race a higher downforce package where balance is key will usually yield the best results. As a result of Sakhir’s rather deserty location, extreme tyre degradation from sand, and tricky braking zones through turn 11 especially, prove to be a difficult combination. Fuel saving, as seen in Australia also comes back into consideration in Bahrain. Turn 4 is a favourite for overtaking if you can be late on the braking and get a wide entry into the corner. Lewis Hamilton made it four for four by securing pole position underlights, ahead of a Ferrari’s Sebastian Vettel, leaving Nico Rosberg chasing up with rear to start P3.

Mercedes both went out on the prime tyre in the beginning of Q1, getting in a few laps to wear the rubber in, before swapping to the option with five minutes remaining. It was no surprise that both Hamilton and Rosberg had an easy passage through to the final session. When it came to crunch time however, Lewis Hamilton had the momentum to continue his perfect form over the weekend, topping all three qualifying sessions. The reigning world champions final run on two lap old soft compound tyres snatched the provisional pole for Vettel with a blinding 1:32.571. While Rosberg’s best time of 1:33.129 can hardly be considered slow, it does show that the team have somewhat underestimated the new found pace in the Ferrari (and possibly the fact that there is a four-time world championship driver behind the wheel). Rosberg therefore settles to start P3 for tomorrow’s race.

Ferrari flew through qualifying, as both Vettel and Raikkonen put in impressive lap times. The battle to out-qualify one another was separated by a mere tenth of a second, with Kimi and Vettel taking it in turns to challenge the Mercedes. In the end it was Vettel who was quickest, pulling out a 1:32.982 on the softs for P2. Kimi’s qualifying got off to a bumpy start, literally, from vibrations due to a rear lock up on his opening lap. The rest of the Finn’s evening was much smoother however, comfortably making his way through to Q3, where a 1:33.227 (0.245s off Vettel) on the option tyre secured P4.

Williams were back on form as both Bottas and Massa put in strong performance to lock out the third row of the grid. While on the soft tyres, Valtteri initially struggled to maximise the pace of the FW37 package, lapping a few tenths off of Felipe’s time. In the final session, Bottas managed to put a near perfect lap together for 1:33.381 for P5. Massa, was 0.363s off his team mate’s pace to secure P6.

Red Bull had the most bipolar qualifying (bar McLaren), with ten places separating the two. Daniel Ricciardo, sporting the lesser of the two downforce rear wing made it through to Q3, where as Kvyat with the higher downforce set up was eliminated after the first session. Seeing as the RB11 is down on speed from the Renault power unit, Ricciardo’s P7 is a massive step in the right direction for the team. On fresh option tyres, Ricciardo was very briefly quickest in Q3, setting a blistering 1:33.850. While the Aussie improved on his time to 1:33.832, it wasn’t for pole, but P7 is still pretty good. Bringing up the rear, Daniil Kvyat qualified in P17.

The Force Indias were strong in qualifying, and unlucky for both not to get through into the top ten shoot out. Hulkenberg’s afternoon went largely without hitch, with the German setting 1:34.450 on the soft tyres for P8. Perez was right on the cusp of Q3 after initially setting the pace with a 1:36.354 on his first Q2 run. As the session wore on and the VJM08’s tyres wore in, Perez improved to a 1:34.704. Unfortunately for the Mexican, his effort was pushed down to P11.

Carlos Sainz just managed to scrape into Q3 with 1:34.641 on the option tyre, out qualifying his team mate. His penultimate run in Q2 nearly went up in dust after running wide through the final corner, though the rookie was able to recover to make it to the top ten shoot out. Sainz knocked a further two tenths off his lap time for P9 with 1:34.462. Max Verstappen couldn’t match Sainz’s pace in the STR10 didn’t make it through the opening session, being eliminated with 1:35.103 for P15.

Lotus’s pace fell away with Romain’s tyres towards the end of qualifying, Grosjean will start from P10. A pace more representative of the E23s competitiveness was seen in Q2 by the Frenchman, who’s P8 could easily have been improved on. Maldonado suffered a rear brake problem in Q1, calling an early finish to the E23’s session. Managing a 1:35.677, Maldonado will start towards the rear in P16.

Both Saubers were absent from the top ten shoot out, despite having a reasonably strong qualifying. Felipe Nasr will start P12 with 1:34.737, ahead of Marcus Ericsson in P13 with a 1:35.034.

McLaren had a rather bittersweet qualifying session. Fernando Alonso made it through to Q2 quite comfortably in P9, while Jenson Button didn’t complete a lap in Q1. Starting P14 with 1:35.039 on two lap soft tyres, Alonso showed promising pace for McLaren, which no-doubt we would have seen from Button too should his McLaren chosen to behave. Jenson Button went out of Q1 with a bang, the MP4-30 stopped on track before completing a single lap. The Briton’s engine, radio, and telemetry switched off completely, hopefully an easy fix for the team.

Rounding out the back of the grid, Manor F1 Team had made very promising progress since the season opener, both cars ran in the qualifying session, and managed to compete with one another for pace. Will Stevens in P18 with 1:38.713 out qualified Robero Mehri P19 with 1:39.722, both within the 107% rule. Go Manor. Soft compound option tyres will be the best bet for Manor ahead of tomorrow’s race, having to make the most out of their stints.

All eyes will be on the top three for tomorrow’s race to see if Hamilton can secure the victory from pole, or if Vettel can lay a challenge. Rather more excitingly, eyes will be on Nico Rosberg to see how the Mercedes driver performs under pressure. One thing is for sure, the first night race of the season will be exciting. Welcome to the sandpit.

– Alex

Australian Grand Prix: Pre Race Thoughts

Australian Grand Prix: Pre Race Thoughts

G’day maaate, welcome to the 2015 Formula 1 World Championship in Melbourne Australia. It’s the 20th year running that F1 returns to the 5.303km circuit at Albert Park. Running clockwise for 58 laps, Albert Park is a brilliant mix of big braking points and smooth running corners. At an average speed of 213 km/h, this one is considered a medium speed track with “only” 65% of a lap spent at full throttle. The hard braking zones, with turn 13 being the heaviest offer a good opportunity to recharge the ERS. Brakeware has a stronger focus in strategy, with teams’ favouring a higher downforce set up carrying an advantage. Doing it’s best to imitate the outback, the bumpy and dusty Albert Park circuit is a demanding track, with overtaking even with DRS proves to be difficult. Turn 3 appears to be the best opportunity for overtaking, but expect some challenges out of the final corner. The tyre allocation for the weekend is the soft, option, and medium, prime Pirelli compounds, with a two-stop strategy being expected. Track temperatures were a warm 38°C for the beginning of Q1, dropping by 10°C by the time Q3 rolled around. The opening qualifying session saw Lewis Hamilton set 1:26.327 to steal pole position by 0.594s, ahead of teammate Nico Rosberg. Williams’, Felipe Massa took P3 with a 1:27.718, indicating that the Grove based team remain the best of the rest compared to the Silver Arrows.

Mercedes refuse to loosen their strong hold on the championship, with the F1 W06 consistently setting a quick pace over the weekend. As the session begun both Hamilton and Rosberg were slippy on the medium compound tyre, with the rear occasionally stepping out. After a few laps were on the board however, the tyre temps and pressures settled in, and Mercedes quickly took their familiar spot at the top of the timesheets for Q1 and Q2.
Hamilton was unchallenged in the final session, setting his 1:26.327 with more than 5 minutes to spare. Rosberg did a bit of maintenance to the grass in Q3, running wide in turn 15 after an unusual lock up in the middle of the apex. With no time set for the German, the pressure was on for Rosberg to deliver a challenge for pole. Unfortunately, Rosberg’s 1:28.510 was comparatively slow to his teammate, settling to line up P2 ahead of tomorrow’s race.

Williams F1 Team played leapfrog with the two Ferraris’ throughout qualifying, though once again held their own in the final moments of the session. Felipe Massa ran a good session in the FW37, remaining just behind the Mercedes both on the medium and soft compound tyres. It was with apparent ease that Massa set a 1:27.718 for P3. Valtteri Bottas took the role of Flying Finn in qualifying, being the stronger of the two in Q1 and Q2, slipping comfortably into P2 in between the Silver Arrows. Painfully, it was Q3 that didn’t come together for Bottas after suffering a lock up on turn 1 of his first flying lap, followed by massively missing the apex of turn 3. After several more attempts to put a lap together, it was the bumpy entry of turn 16 that mocked the FW37, sending Bottas wide and spoiling what was a strong lap. As a result, the Williams is slightly out of expected position in P6 with 1:28.087.

Ferrari must get up very early in the morning as the Scuderia’s haven’t looked this strong since the 2008 season. The SF15-T was not only quick, but maintained bite throughout the session, remaining competitive in the latter end of Q3 where the Ferrari fell away last season. The highly anticipated arrival of Sebastian Vettel to partner Kimi Raikkonen makes the driver line up a fan favourite, and it would appear that Seb’s cheek is well matched with Kimi. “Sebastian, what kind of Ferrari have you got ahead of tomorrow’s race?”, “A red one…”. Neither Vettel nor Raikkonen are strangers to the sharp end of the timesheets, with a P4 and P5 for the team, a podium definitely isn’t out of reach.

Local hero and Red Bull’s new front man, Daniel Ricciardo received cheers every time he crossed the line from the Webber Grandstand. After suffering from an early engine change on Friday, Ricciardo recovered to run consistently on Saturday in Q1 on the medium compound tyres, before flinging himself into P6 to see him pass through to the top ten shoot out. Shaving a few tenths off the Q2 time, Ricciardo set a 1:28.087 as the checkered flag fell briefly putting the Aussie in P3, before being bumped down to a relatively competitive P7. Daniil Kvyat was last out in Q1, making his first appearance with less than three minutes remaining in the session. It was a disappointing first outing for Kvyat stepping up into the Red Bull seat as handling issues and an over enthusiastic throttle that had plagued FP3 carried through into Saturday afternoon. Unable to make the cut, Kvyat battled the RB11 for 1:29.070, an improvement from 1:30.402 in Q1, though still considerably off the pace. The Russian lines up P13 for tomorrow’s race.

The Toro Rosso’s were another surprise challenge in qualifying with both drivers finishing inside the top ten after Q1. Carlos Sainz’s pace in the STR10 impressed in in qualifying, despite spinning at turn 4 after dipping a toe on the grass. Sainz controlled the Renault powered Toro Rosso to put together flying lap after flying lap. It was no surprise therefore that the rookie made it through to the top ten shoot out to piece together a lap of 1:28.510 on the soft tyres. Just 0.2s off big brother, Daniel Ricciardo, Sainz lines up P8. The youngest on the grid had a lot to prove in his debut qualifying session, to which he delivered. Max Verstappen was similarly quick on the pace in Q1, with his performance leaving Helmut Marko unphased. However his session came to an early end after complaining over the radio that there was something behind his right shoulder, the rookie held the STR10 together s best he could for a 1:28.868, just missing out on the top ten shoot out in P12.

The new and improved Lotus F1 Team were a happy addition to the top ten shoot out, proving that the switch to Mercedes power at the end of last season was a good decision. Although Maldonado had to battle with understeer, and then oversteer on his flying lap in Q1, the Venezuelan kept it together and soon the E23 behaved. Both Grosjean and Maldonado were quicker than the Red Bulls and Toro Rosso’s in Q2, indicating the the E23 is more than ready to put up a strong fight. The Enstone based team appeared to suffer most from the 10°C drop in track temperature, losing pace in the back end of Q3. So it was P9 for Grosjean and P10 for Maldonado with 1:28.560 and 1:29.480 on the soft compound tyres.

Sauber’s weekend so far has been a touch dramatic, with car issues during practice and you know, the whole issue of seemingly having 3-drivers signed to a 2-seat team… Putting the paddock drama to one side, Felipe Nasr was something of a dark horse on Saturday, out-qualifying his teammate by 5 grid positions. In the final moments of Q2, Nasr set a competitive flying lap of 1:28.800, briefly seeing the rookie inside the top ten. Although it was the two Lotus’ final effort that bumped the Sauber down to P11. Markus Ericsson’s new outfit is at least, more competitive than a Caterham… Unfortunately for the Swede the best the C34 could offer him didn’t even dip below the 1:30s. A difficult final flying lap for Ericsson put together 1:31.376 for P16.

Force India were absent for the Q1 and Q3, resulting in both Hulkenberg and Perez being literally absent in Q3. Despite having the advantage of a Mercedes power-unit, the VJM08 lacked both pace and bite into the corners. In an uneventful Q1, Hulkenberg and Perez managed to remain out of the dropzone to progress to the second session. And while it was a improvement on both times, 1:29.208 for Hulkenberg and 1:29.209 for Perez were the best the duo could muster for P14 and P15 respectively. In an effort to find a silver lining, at least Hulkenberg and Perez appeared consistent with each others lap times, even if it was three seconds off the pace to the leaders.

The issues keep on coming for McLaren Honda, with Button and Magnussen rounding off the grid. Considerably down on power, Button and Magnussen posed little threat even to Sauber, only managing 1:31.422 and 1:32.037 respectively, a massive 1.5s off the pace to progress through the grid. Manor F1 Team have put in an incredible effort to make it to the season opener on Australia. Unfortunately for the team, a software issue has plagued Manor over the course of weekend, resulting in yet another session that both drivers’ were forced to sit out. It was therefore, “no time set” for Will Stevens and Roberto Merhi in qualifying.

So Mercedes remain in a league of their own ahead of tomorrow’s race, while a surprising battle between the Williams and Ferrari is emerging. It remains to be seen if Ferrari can hold out to make the distance competitively, or if the Scuderia will fall short on the demanding circuit. Williams will no doubt be a worthy adversary, being strong both in terms of pace and aero setup. Further back in the grid, we can expect battles between the Red Bulls, Lotus, and Toro Rossos for a tantalising cocktail of vetran and rookie skill. McLaren, aside from Manor have the biggest challenge ahead of them, with their aim likely to be to finish the race without sacrificing an engine. Adding to excitement, the locals predict rain for race day, but it is Melbourne in March, could be either blazing sunshine of absolute downpour… Either way, the season opener will be top show.

– Alex

Ps. It’s good to be back.