Monaco Grand Prix: Pit Stop Woes

Monaco Grand Prix: Pit Stop Woes

Nico Rosberg made it a hatrick of wins in the Principality at today’s Monaco Grand Prix after inheriting the lead during a disastrous pit stop strategy under the safety car. Following on, on worn soft compound tyres, Ferrari’s Sebastian Vettel fought hard to keep his newly earned second place from Lewis Hamilton. The podium result soon saw a somewhat bewildered Nico Rosberg, from an ecstatic Sebastian Vettel, and a less-than-usually-sulky Lewis Hamilton. At lights out, Hamilton was quick off the line, keeping his team mate behind him. Vettel immediately had to defend his position from Red Bull’s Daniil Kvyat, who incidentally nearly ran into the back of the Ferrari for some very late braking. Daniel Ricciardo, in the other Red Bull tried to make a move around the outside of Vettel and Kvyat, though the move failed to come to pass. Ricciardo conceded a place to Kvyat through turn 1, relegating the RB11 to P4. Snaking their way through, Alonso in the McLaren and Hulkenberg in the Force India made contact through Mirabeau, resulting the the VJM08 losing it’s front wing in the barrier. Hulkenberg limped back to the pits for a new front wing, losing several positions.

Some undoubtably awkward conversations will be happening over in the Mercedes camp following a definite 1-2 Hamilton-Rosberg victory being thrown away by an unnecessary pit stop under the safety car. Hamilton had led the entirety of the race, managing to keep the brakes cool and pull a +9s lead on Rosberg at times, all before the appearance of the safety car on lap 65. Initially running both cars on a one-stop strategy, the pit wall decided to call Hamilton in for a second stop under the safety car to swap to fresh super soft tyres. A move that made no sense given that there were barely 10-laps left in the race, and almost no opportunity to over take. Without a large enough gap, Hamilton emerged from the pits behind seemingly Vettel, and after a brief investigation over position on track vs. crossing the safety car line, where he would stay. Overall it wasn’t the easiest race for the Mercedes camp.

At least one face on the podium looked pleased to be stood where he was. Sebastian Vettel clearly pushed hard from lights out, never letting the Mercedes ahead get out of reach. The Scuderia initially tried to take Rosberg with an undercut in the pit stops, but failed to pay off the move against the F1 W06. Moving up to P2 from Hamilton’s pit under the safety car, Vettel was concerned that his tyres would lose too much temperature due to the lapped cars unlapping themselves (a long an arduous process). As we went racing once more, Vettel had to defend from a Mercedes right on his gearbox. There wasn’t an opportunity for Vettel to challenge Rosberg for the top step, so the Ferrari focussed on getting his tyres back up to temperature and pulling a large enough gap to keep Hamilton at bay. A strategy that worked as the Mercedes was unable to pass. Further back in the field, Kimi Raikkonen was clearly annoyed* by the traffic through the streets. Monaco isn’t Kimi’s favourite track, though the Ferrari clearly pushed hard to fight for his position. Keeping on the tail of Ricciardo, Raikkonen closed the gap to the Red Bull. Following the safety car however, some contact between the two pushed Raikkonen back to P6.

Red Bull finished the race in a healthy P4 and P5 for their drivers, with Daniil Kvyat finishing ahead of Daniel Ricciardo. Both Dan’s drove a strong race, with Kvyat’s start off the line, and Ricciardo’s overtaking following the safety car being highlights for the two. Once the safety car had peeled in, Ricciardo was told he could attack the cars in front, and attack he did, making up two positions in the two laps following. Pulling off a rather bold move on Raikkonen, which after an investigation by the stewards saw no further action. Ricciardo had then the opportunity to challenge for a podium finish against Hamilton. However with the Mercedes remaining just out of reach, and Kvyat lapping quicker, the Aussie was told over radio if he couldn’t make the overtake to let Kvyat through. Ricciardo obliged and the team scored some solid points between them.

Force India got off to a bumpy start after contact between Alonso and Hulkenberg on the opening lap, costing the Hulk several positions. Sergio Perez however had a strong drive, showing what the Mercedes powered VJM08 is capable of around the tight streets of Monaco. Starting from P7, Checo put together a flawless race, managing a two stop strategy of softs in the middle stint, before switching back to the super softs under the safety car to build a strong challenge against Kimi Raikkonen. Unfortunately for the Mexican, the race ran out of laps, and he was unable to catch the Ferrari and settling for P7. Nico Hulkenberg  dropped to the back of the grid from lap one, though was able to claw his way back up to finish just outside of the points in P11.

A bittersweet result for McLaren-Mercedes, who managed to bring just one car to the chequered flag, that car however did manage to pick up 4 points! More than the Woking based team have collected all season. Starting from P10, and with the odds against him, Jenson Button managed the temperamental Honda power unit keeping a competitive one-stop strategy right up until the safety car. Covering their bases, he team pit Button under the safety car to finish the race on the quicker super-soft tyres as Perez and Nasr pit around him. The strategy paid off as Button finished in P8, his best result all season. Fernando Alonso was less lucky, being handed a 5-second stop-go penalty for causing the collision with Hulkenberg on the opening lap (which he unknowingly served on lap 33, and finally retiring due to a gearbox issue ten laps later.

Sauber had a somewhat anonymous race, with Felipe Nasr finishing just inside the points in P9, and Marcus Ericsson coming home in P13. Running on a one-stop, Nasr initially made up positions on Alonso and Grosjean, though was promoted to P9 through the retirements of Maldonado, Alonso, and Verstappen. Nasr came in to pit for a second time under the safety car, though failed to make up a position. Marcus Ericsson was running on a two-stop, though pitted under the safety as well. Overall, it was a bit of an underwhelming race for the team.

Bringing home a single point, the Toro Rosso garage were robbed of something to really celebrate for. Carlos Sainz, starting from the pit lane managed a one-stop strategy, pitting on lap 12 for the harder of the two compound tyres. Sainz made up several positions before the safety car, finishing a promising P9. Max Verstappen started the race with storming pace, however a slow stop for the STR10 cost the rookie some time. Verstappen quickly worked on closing the gap to get back into the points. The battle soon saw the Toro Rosso approach the back of Romain Grosjean in the E23. After a bold attempt at the hairpin, Verstappen remained behind the Lotus. Keeping on Grosjean’s gearbox, Verstappen made another attempt at the position, though failed to pull the dummy manoeuvre and misjudging the Lotus’ braking. The STR10 caught the right rear of the E23, snapping the front left wish-bone and sending Verstappen straight into the barriers at Mirabeau. Fortunately, Verstappen emerged unscathed from the hefty impact. Unfortunately, Verstappen has also been handed a grid penalty for Canada, and had points added to his super licence.

Romain Grosjean was the only Lotus to finish the race as Pastor’s E23 pulled a sicky earlier in the race. Maldonado, starting off strong, was called into retire after a brake by wire failure on lap 8. Though a short lived race, Maldonado did pick up some contact first with Massa into turn 1, and then Verstappen at Tabac. Keeping his head down, Grosjean maintained a competitive pace on a one-stop strategy, though was unable to make a points finish stick. The E23 finishing just outside in P12.

It too was an anonymous race for Williams, who, not hoping for much, finished in P14 and P15. It was all too clear that the FW37 is suited to long high speed straights, and as Monaco barely has one, the team struggled. Valtteri Bottas maintained a two-stop strategy, pitting just before the safety car to finish P14. Felipe Massa had a difficult start, having to pit on the opening lap following contact from Maldonado. The stop was a long one owing to a necessary front wing change. Massa then raced on a two-stop strategy, before pitting for a third time under the safety car to finish P15.

Roberto Merhi and Will Stevens for Manor F1 Team are undoubtably sick of the sight the blue flags, having spent the entirety of the race having them waved in their visors. That being said, both cars managed to finish the race, which in itself is an accomplishment in Monaco. Merhi finished ahead of his team mate in P16, to Stevens P17.

After a rather quiet start (or 60-odd laps), the Monaco Grand Prix did deliver it’s usual spectacle of nail biting attempts to overtake and safety car appearances. Though it wasn’t quite the victory that Rosberg would have been hoping for, the result has closed the championship points gap to just ten points. So, that’s something for Mercedes, or Vettel to think about. The championship now moves on to Montréal, for the Canadian Grand Prix. Not always the most exciting of races, though Daniel Ricciardo did take his first Formula 1 victory there last year, so personally I’m hoping for a repeat. Until then, à tout à l’heure.

– Alex

Spanish Grand Prix: Rosberg’s Race

Spanish Grand Prix: Rosberg’s Race

Nico Rosberg took home his first race victory of the season at today’s Spanish Grand Prix. A controlled race from the start, Rosberg managed a two stop strategy to finish 13 seconds clear of teammate, Lewis Hamilton, and a massive 48 seconds clear of third placed, Sebastian Vettel. Apart from a few bruised front jack-men, and a mysteriously missing rear end plate, the Spanish Grand Prix got underway smoothly. There wasn’t even a Renault powered retirement. At lights out, Rosberg stormed ahead while Hamilton was left behind due to excessive wheel spin, allowing Vettel to slip himself into P2 leading into the first corner. Already on the back foot, Hamilton had to defend his now P3 position from Bottas in the Williams. The rest of the grid snaked their way through safely, though Maldonado did receive some contact somewhere and somehow in the pack.

The Mercedes team, celebrating yet another 1-2 finish, split their drivers strategies today. Rosberg running off a two-stop started on the mediums, swapping to the hard compound tyre in the middle, before swapping back to the medium tyre in the final stint found that the F1 W06 still had a considerable amount of rear grip as he crossed the line. Hamilton, however, went for a three-stop strategy after using up too much of his front tyres chasing down Vettel in the opening laps. The Briton’s first stop was a slow one due to a reluctant left rear tyre. Coming back out behind Maldonado cost the Mercedes valuable time in chasing down the Ferrari. After Vettel’s final stop, Hamilton was able to pull enough of a lead to hold P2. Still a good 13 seconds behind Rosberg, Hamilton was told over the radio that catching his teammate would be “impossible”, settling the Mercedes for second.

The aero upgrades that Ferrari brought with them to Spain were somewhat of an anti climax, as when it came down to crunch time, Vettel wasn’t able to catch the Mercedes. Making the most of a good start, Vettel’s two-stop strategy starting on the medium and ending on the hard compound still gave the German a podium position. An irritated Vettel was held up in traffic after his final stop, making a challenge for P2 out of the question. In the other Ferrari, Kimi Raikkonen nursed his medium compound tyres, only coming in to pit on lap 20. (Only Alonso in the McLaren lasted longer on the medium tyres, pitting on lap 24. But things didn’t work out too well for Alonso in the end, so it doesn’t really count). Swapping to the hard compound for the middle stint, and back to the medium compound for the final stint, Kimi was able to close the gap to less than a second ahead of fourth placed Bottas. The fight of the Finns last right down to the final corner, where Bottas remained just out of reach. Overall, a P3 for Vettel and P5 for Kimi was a strong finish for the Scuderia.

It was a positive day for Williams, with both Bottas and Massa finishing comfortably within the points. Bottas’ defending from a fresh and hungry Raikkonen was arguably the most exciting thing to happen to the team for the entirety of the race. Massa, starting from P9, made an early move on Daniil Kvyat and Carlos Sainz to climb up to P7, later making up a further place on Daniel Ricciardo to finish P6.

Red Bull managed, not only to make an entire race distance without a Renault power failure, but to bring both boys home within the points. Daniel Ricciardo finished ahead of his teammate in P7, while Kvyat was further back in P10 after a bold move by Sainz saw the Russian lose a place.

In the weird and wonderful way that Lotus like to do things, Romain Grosjean and Pastor Maldonado provided some entertainment while both delivering a strong race performances. Starting from P11, Grosjean had a difficult race after losing fourth gear in the middle stint. Coming in for his second stop, on to the hard compound tyres, Grosjean found the E23 really had lost all grip. Overstepping the grid spot and giving the front jack-man a little nod in his, er, crown jewels. Luckily it wasn’t anything a bag of frozen peas and a bandage couldn’t fix for the jack-man, and Romain went on to finish P8. Maldonado it seems, took the Lotus sponsorship of Mad Max a little too literally, damaging his rear wing early on in the race. A longer pit stop on lap 15 saw the mechanics fix *cough* remove the broken end plate, and Pastor raced on in his E22.5 somehow matching the pace of the fully functioning E23 of Romain. Physics. Unfortunately for the team, Maldonado had to come in to retire at the end of lap 45.

… More to come

– Alex

Bahrain Grand Prix: Mercedes And A Flying Ferrari

Bahrain Grand Prix: Mercedes And A Flying Ferrari

Once again, Lewis Hamilton took the top step of the podium on a Sunday afternoon, managing his race from pole position to extend his championship lead by 27 points. Kimi Raikkonen took the drive of the day, pulling off a two-stop strategy to keep his tyres grippy and ruin Mercedes hopes of a 1-2 finish. The Ferrari finished on the second step of the podium ahead of Nico Rosberg in third. Hamilton had a clean getaway, pulling an early lead and leaving Rosberg to try and challenge Vettel into the first corner. Unbeknownst to Rosberg, Raikkonen was eyeing up a move on the Mercedes going out around the outside into turn 1 and moving himself up to P3. Further back in the grid, Maldonado and Verstappen got a bit too close for comfort as the two made contact, leaving Verstappen with some front wing damage. The rest of the grid snaked their way through reasonably unscathed, Ericsson was the big winner in the opening lap, making up four places moving himself into P9.

Lewis Hamilton took home the race victory after managing a two stop strategy. Starting on the option tyre, Hamilton’s first stop on lap 18 saw him stick to the soft compound before swapping to the medium prime tyre for the final stint. Hamilton’s drive to victory was rather unchallenged, although the Ferrari of Kimi Raikkonen did creep closer in the final laps due to a brake-by-wire issue with the F1 W06. Nico Rosberg delivered the fight we’d been waiting for at the Sakhir circuit. Opting for the same tyre strategy as Hamilton, Rosberg had to defend and then attack two attempts of a Ferrari undercut by Vettel. It would have been a 1-2 finish for Mercedes had Rosberg’s tyres not gone in the final leg of the race. With little grip, the German ran wide in the final laps, letting Raikkonen through easily and relinquishing the Mercedes to P3.

Ferrari posed more of a threat to the two Mercedes, though some silly errors by Sebastian cost him a podium finish. Both the Ferraris got off to a flying start, with Vettel retaining P2 in the opening stint, and Raikkonen pulling a sneaky jump on Rosberg. It was Kimi’s cool tyre management that allowed the F15 T to remain competitive right down to the final corner. Even on the “slower” medium compound tyre, Raikkonen was lapping a second quicker than the rest of the field. Vettel on the other hand couldn’t keep the grip in his tyres, and an off moment defending from Rosberg not only cost him a position, but valuable lap time and a nose change. When Vettel returned to the track, he was unable to pass Bottas in the Williams. Reluctantly Vettel finished behind the FW37 in P5.

– Alex

Chinese Grand Prix: Mercedes Rivalry

Chinese Grand Prix: Mercedes Rivalry

Lewis Hamilton returned to the top step of the podium after the Chinese Grand Prix. The Mercedes driver took the win from pole position, finishing ahead of his teammate, Nico Rosberg, and Ferrari’s Sebastian Vettel. The final laps of the race were neutralised following the deployment of the safety car on lap 54. For the first time this season, 20 cars were on the grid for lights out. Hamilton was quick off the line, angling his F1 W06 to defend from Rosberg. While slightly further back, Sebastian Vettel passed Massa, immediately moving up in P3. In the other Ferrari, Kimi lined up behind the two Williams to move up on the inside of turn 2, giving himself the better line through turn 3 to pass Bottas and then Massa later in the lap. The rest of the grid snaked their way through the first corner relatively unscathed, with some contact between the two Toro Rossos.

Hamilton once again outstretched his Championship lead after being relatively unchallenged throughout the race. The Mercedes duo ran the same tyre strategy during the race, running the soft tyres for the first two stints, before swapping to medium compound tyres for the final leg. Rosberg however felt his race was compromised, complaining that his teammate was cruising in front of him. This then allowed Vettel to catch up to the Mercedes causing Rosberg to defend and use his tyres. Despite this, Rosberg still came home P2 in front of Vettel.

Ferrari had a competitive race for both Vettel and Kimi, finishing P3 and P4 respectively. It was a stormer of a first lap for both drivers, managing to pass the two Williams in the first sector. Like the Mercedes, Ferrari chose the run the soft compound tyres for the first two stints before swapping to the medium tyre for the final stint. The team didn’t however manage to make an undercut for Vettel to challenge for the win, despite pushing like hell to pull the gap. Kimi Raikkonen was on form from the get-go. Back to his old ways the Finn didn’t let up, maintaining his tyres until the final laps. However, Verstappen’s retirement on lap 54 robbed us of what would probably the most exciting battle for position in the race.

Williams were strong throughout the afternoon, maintaining a healthy position for both Massa and Bottas. However, being Ferrari’s main target for the race meant having to be on the defence from lights out. While the Williams were unable to keep their position from the Scuderia, Massa and Bottas were able to engage in some good old competitive rivalry amongst teammates. In the opening stages, Bottas made a move on Massa, moving himself up to P5, only for Massa to lay a move a few corners later. The two spent the remainder of the race in the same positions, eventually finishing P5 for Massa and P6 for Bottas after a two stop strategy.

Lotus scored their first points of the season as Romain Grosjean came home in P7. Keeping out of trouble, Grosjean managed his tyres well, running on the soft compound before running the final two stints on the medium tyre. Pastor Maldonado was not so lucky however. After a strong start, passing Felipe Nasr in the early stages, Maldonado began to show signs of braking issues after missing the entrance to the pit lane, and spinning a few laps later. Falling back in the grid, the E23 then found himself in the midst of a McLaren sandwich, simultaneously challenging Button for P13 and defending from a charging* Alonso. Maldonado’s luck ran out on lap 49 after behind rear-ended by Button, forcing the Lotus to retire on lap 52.

Both Sauber’s collected points, with Nasr finishing P8 ahead of Ericsson in P10. Ericsson lost a position early on after running wide on the opening lap and allowing the Lotus of Pastor Maldonado through. Despite some good battles for the team, the C34 was a little down on pace even with the Ferrari power. However, a well managed two-stop strategy did allow for a few battles for position for Felipe Nasr.

Red Bull continue to rue the Renault power, with Ricciardo picking up just two points for the team. Taking a somewhat unwanted leaf out of Mark Webber’s book, Ricciardo struggled with the anti-stall off the line, losing 10 places before reaching the first corner. The Renault power continued to misbehave, completely giving out in a ball of smoke on Daniil Kvyat on lap 17.

It was mixed feelings for Force India, with only one car finishing the race. Sergio Perez was unlucky to finish outside of the points in P11. Unable to maintain competitive tyres, the team switched Perez to a three stop strategy, however this failed to come off in a points finish. Nico Hulkenberg was the first retirement of the race, crawling to a halt on lap 10 after reporting over the radio that something wasn’t right with his gearbox, as it turns out there was something wrong.

In a step in the right direction, both McLaren’s finished the race. Alonso and Button both managed to engage in some competitive battles for position, albiet at the back of the grid. However, some contact with Maldonado nearly cost Button his race. Alonso eventually came home P12 ahead of Button, who finished P13.

Toro Rosso were another to have a bittersweet race, with Verstappen becoming a late retirement from a strong and points scoring finish. The rookie driver continued to race beyond his years with late braking into the corners without locking up or getting too close. Verstappen’s best battle was with Felipe Nasr in the middle stint. It was a slightly more difficult race for Carlos Sainz, losing positions after suffering a spin on the second lap. Eventually finishing outside of the points in P14. The feel good race moment goes to Manor F1 Team, with both Will Stevens and Roberto Mehri starting the race and making it all the way to the chequered flag. Stevens finished ahead of Mehri in P15 and P16 respectively.

Without a break, the championship moves to the Middle East for the Bahrain Grand Prix next weekend where the track is hot, hard, and abrasive. A nightmare for tyre management.

– Alex

* As charging as a McLaren-Honda can be this season

Australian Grand Prix: Another One Bites The Dust

Australian Grand Prix: Another One Bites The Dust

Lewis Hamilton takes an early lead on the 2015 season after taking the top step of the podium at the Australian Grand Prix. The reigning world champion walked it home around the park from pole position. His teammate, Nico Rosberg did all he can to keep Hamilton in his sights, but never managed to lay a challenge for the lead. Sebastian Vettel took out the final step of the podium for the Scuderia.

It was a considerably smaller grid for the season opener, with Bottas being ruled out due to a back injury following qualifying, Daniil Kvyat suffering from gearbox failure on his way to the grid, and Kevin Magnussen’s McLaren flat out giving up before the formation lap was even underway. So at lights out, it was 15 cars that snaked their way through turn 1. Hamilton flew off the line, with Rosberg leading the hunt. Further back on the grid, Lotus’ Romain Grosjean crawled off the line with a cut in power to the Mercedes engine, while Toro Rosso’s Carlos Sainz moved himself up to P6 before the first corner, slotting in behind Kimi Raikkonen.

The two Ferraris’ went into turn 1 side-by-side, with Vettel riding the kerb leaving very little room for Kimi to move. The Finn backed out of the corner, but clipped Sainz on his way through, leaving the STR10 twitching to keep traction. Sauber’s Felipe Nasr got caught up in the action as Kimi’s front right tyre made contact with the C34, and in turn clipping the left rear of Pastor Maldonado’s E23. Clearly coming off worst out of the opening lap altercation, the E23 lost rear traction, spinning counter clockwise and careering backwards into the barriers out of turn 2. An unlucky start to the season for the number 13 driver. The stranded E23 triggered the release of the safety car, and a flurry of action in the pit lane as strategies reshuffled.

Mercedes essentially were going through the formalities at Albert Park, with the 1-2 finish for the team remaining unchallenged. Starting on the soft compound tyres, Hamilton was first of the pair to box on lap 26 for the medium compound tyre, with Rosberg following suit one lap later. Rosberg maintained the gap to his teammate at around 1.6s during the second stint of the race, though neither driver pushed each other in a bid to save fuel. Rosberg suffered from harsher tyre degradation compared to his teammate, fearing that he may have to pit for a second time towards the back end of the race. Given that the Silver Arrows had more than a 30-second lead on the rest of the pack, Rosberg’s tyre woes didn’t make much of a difference.

The Scuderia have emerged as an early challenger to Mercedes, with Sebastian Vettel putting the SFT-15 into P3. Starting from P4, Vettel managed to jump Felipe Massa’s FW37 during the pit window. As Massa came in for the prime tyre on lap 21, the Scuderia decided to keep Vettel out and push to make the gap in front of the Williams. Four laps later, the German pulled in for his turn to swap to the prime tyre, emerging a solid distance ahead of Massa and retaining his potential podium finish. The challenges piled up from lights out for Kimi Raikkonen becoming the final DNF of the race. Firstly, the Finn was forced to back out of the corner on the opening lap by his new teammate, resulting in his SFT15 picking up front wing damage and losing considerable downforce. The early contact then saw Kimi fall down the order from a healthy P5, to a struggling P8. The Ferrari did however manage to take a storming Carlos Sainz through turn 9, stepping out and around the Toro Rosso to move up into P7 on lap 8. Powering through, Kimi’s first stop on lap 17 for a new set of the option tyres cost him even more time and grid positions as a stubborn left rear wheel nut refuse to tighten. Finally on lap 43, the Finn came in for his swap to the medium compound tyre, but yet again it was the left rear causing havoc for the team. Kimi was halfway down the pit lane before realising that something was wrong, with the left rear having not been properly secured, he was forced to pull over and switch off the engine at turn 3.

Williams were unlucky not to reach the podium in today’s race, with their pit stop strategy being the only weak point. Felipe’s swap to medium tyre was smooth and to plan to keep the FW37 in contention for third place, however it was back on track with Massa being caught behind Sainz’ Toro Rosso that allowed Vettel to pull the large enough gap from the Williams in the pit window. Nevertheless, Massa picked up some early points, finishing a comfortable P4. Valtteri Bottas was ruled out of starting the race due to a back injury picked up during Saturday’s qualifying session. Bottas failed the second of two fitness tests enforced the the FIA to ensure driver safety, leaving the Finn to watch on from the garage on Sunday.

For something completely different, Sauber decided to move their battles from the court room to the race track, with both drivers picking up points. Already more than the Swiss team achieved in the entirety of the 2014 season. Rookie Felipe Nasr without question took out drive of the day, taking an early advantage from P8. The Brazilian made light work of his fellow rookie, Carlos Sainz on lap 4, slipping the C34 in front of the STR10 on the start finish straight. Nasr then passed a slightly off-pace Daniel Ricciardo for P5, paving the way for the rest of the race. It was clear from qualifying that Nasr would be a threat to the mid-field following practice and qualifying, but it was hardly expected that the rookie would spend his debut F1 race defending from a hungry honey badger. Nasr not only managed his tyres, but kept the C34 competitive to cross the line P5. Teammate Marcus Ericsson picked up valuable points in P8, after a strong but tough race for the Swede. Running wide and through the gravel in the final stint of the race, Ericsson pit for a set of the option tyre, rejoining behind Perez and Sainz. On fresher tyres, Ericsson moved up behind Sainz, managing to outbrake the now struggling STR10 on lap 56, slipping down the inside to take P8.

Daniel Ricciardo was left to bring it home for the Red Bull team after Daniil Kvyat retired on his way to the grid. Kvyat, for his first race in the big sister team, lost drive on his out lap after failing to select fifth gear in the RB11. The gearbox failure forced the Russian to park up before even reaching the grid, joining Bottas, and soon Magnussen as a DNS. Homeboy Daniel Ricciardo delivered a strong race despite early set backs. The RB11 had considerably less power in the opening stint, resulting in the Aussie conceding several places in the opening laps. However, as the race wore on, and temperatures warmed, Ricciardo stalked Carlos Sainz for P6, and began the hunt on Nasr for P5. Caught up in the battle, Raikkonen gave Ricciardo something to think about as the Red Bull driver managed to keep the Ferrari in his mirrors while keeping the gap to Nasr at 0.8s. Going to the end on the medium tyre after pitting on lap 24, Ricciardo didn’t quite manage to make a move on Nasr stick. Though given the challenges the RB11 has already faced this season, a P6 finish will keep Ricciardo smiling until Malaysia.

Force India decided to split their drivers’ strategies, having Perez start on the medium compound tyre, while Hulkenberg got off the line on the softs. Nico Hulkenberg managed to keep his VJM08 out of trouble to finish a quiet P7. Stopping on lap 23 for the medium compound, and then again for a final time on lap 46 for the soft compound to go to the end. The Hulk noticeably challenged Max Verstappen before the STR10’s untimely retirement. Sergio Perez drew slightly more attention during the race, playing cat and mouse with his former teammate at McLaren, Jenson Button. After a few failed attempts to make a move stick from the back end of the grid, Perez moved up on the inside of Button on the inside of turn 3. As Button refused to yield the two made contact, leaving the Mexican in a spin and in P13. Somehow not noticing the shower of bodywork rain down upon him, Perez radioed that he hadn’t attracted any damage and resumed the chase to Button. It wasn’t until Kimi’s retirement from the race that Perez managed to pace the McLaren. In a cruel set of circumstances, Button was in contention for a single point in P10, before Perez, on fresher tyres took Button on lap 44.

Toro Rosso picked a brilliant pair of rookie drivers, with both Carlos Sainz and Max Verstappen delivering drives beyond their years. Sainz finished somewhat out of position in P9 following an excruciatingly slow stop on lap 26. Like Raikkonen, it was the left rear that caused the issue, refusing to loosen. The Spanish rookie sat patiently* as the pit crew tried to get the Toro Rosso moving. Max Verstappen was reluctantly added to the list of DNFs for the race following a power unit failure on lap 33. The 17-year-old rookie had driven incredibly to make a later stop back to the option tyre on lap 33. Being on the stickier, quicker rubber, and being considerably lighter on fuel load, Verstappen emerged in P9 eager and ready to carve his way back to his P5 taken by Raikkonen. Unfortunately, the Renault power unit had other ideas, billowing smoke and forcing Verstappen to park up at the entry to the pit lane. It was a valiant effort by the rookie, and a strong points finished spoiled by reliability issues.

McLaren Honda were the unlucky lot, with Jenson Button being the only car to finish outside of the points.
Button fought valiantly to keep the McLaren going, having not even completed a race distance yet this season. Managing the tyres from lap 1, Button held off Perez for almost the entirety of the race, briefly beating the Mercedes power with Honda power. Eventually finishing P11, it was a bitter sweet result for the team who, deciding the treat the race like another test session, were not expecting to even finish the race, but to come so close to scoring a point and losing it have a lot of positive and negatives to take away from Melbourne. Kevin Magnussen was another DNS with the MP4-30’s Honda power unit packing it in before the race began.

After a strong practice and qualifying for Lotus, it was a low blow as both drivers were DNC for the race. The opening lap scramble saw Pastor Maldonado get caught up in a tangle that wasn’t his fault to retire 10 seconds into the race. Meanwhile an immediate and inexplicable loss of power to Romain Grosjean’s E23 saw the Frenchman crawl back to the garage to retire at the end of the first lap. A short and frustrating race for the Enstone team.

While the 1-2 Mercedes finish was, *cough* somewhat predictable, the Australian Grand Prix lived up to it’s anticipation. It was the rookie drivers that delivered the best on track action, with the likes of Felipe Nasr and Max Verstappen particularly standing out. This season promises to deliver challenges for the “not-so-underdog-but-kind-of-now-an-underdog” McLaren, and anyone powered by Renault power, as well as chances for the rookie drivers to hold their own against race vetrans. The championship now moves in two weeks to the hot and humid Sepang International Circuit for the Malaysian Grand Prix, until then, ‘Ooroo!

– Alex

* Silently screaming expletives.

Images Courtesy of Lotus F1 Team.